Tag: Blue-Lined Grouper (Cephalopholis formosa)

Along with its close relative, the Black-Tip Grouper (Epinephelus fasciatus), the Blue-Lined Grouper (Cephalopholis formosa) is one of the most common species of Grouper found in local waters.

Growing to a maximum length of around 35cm, the Blue-Lined Grouper is of comparable size with the majority of other local Grouper species, although it is one of the easiest to identify.

With an overall brownish/olive green colouration, it is the distinctive neon blue horizontal lines on the body, breaking into smaller lines and spots on the face which make the species so easily recognizable.

A wide ranging species, the Blue-Lined Grouper is equally as common around the shallower inshore reef areas as it is at the deeper offshore sites such as Sail Rock.

Individuals found at the shallower reef areas appear bolder than those at the offshore locations, where they are noticeably more difficult to approach (unlike the Black-Tip Groupers).

During the day, they will often hang out amongst the branches of Staghorn Corals (Acropora Cervicornis) in the shallower areas, or in crevices occupied by Glass Cleaner Shrimps (Urocaridella Antonbruunii) at the deeper sites.

Along with its close relative, the Black-Tip Grouper (Epinephelus fasciatus), the Blue-Lined Grouper (Cephalopholis formosa) is one of the most common species of Grouper found in local waters.

Growing to a maximum length of around 35cm, the Blue-Lined Grouper is of comparable size with the majority of other local Grouper species, although it is one of the easiest to identify.

With an overall brownish/olive green colouration, it is the distinctive neon blue horizontal lines on the body, breaking into smaller lines and spots on the face which make the species so easily recognizable.

A wide ranging species, the Blue-Lined Grouper is equally as common around the shallower inshore reef areas as it is at the deeper offshore sites such as Sail Rock.

Individuals found at the shallower reef areas appear bolder than those at the offshore locations, where they are noticeably more difficult to approach (unlike the Black-Tip Groupers).

During the day, they will often hang out amongst the branches of Staghorn Corals (Acropora Cervicornis) in the shallower areas, or in crevices occupied by Glass Cleaner Shrimps (Urocaridella Antonbruunii) at the deeper sites.

Alan's picture
Blue-Lined Grouper (Cephalopholis Formosa)

A Blue-Lined Grouper (Cephalopholis Formosa) resting in a crevice at Sail Rock where it is enjoying the attention of some