Tag: Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus)

Reaching a maximum length of around 120cm, the impressive Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) is one of the largest Grouper species in the area, second only to the Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus malabaricus) (although there has been at least one confirmed sighting of a Giant Grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus).

Although its size alone makes identification relatively easy, the Brown-Marbled Grouper has other characteristics which make it one of the more recognizable local Groupers.

Relative to its length, the Brown-Marbled Grouper is also very thick set compared to many of its smaller relatives.

It typically has a brown to yellow/brown overall colour with numerous small brown/black spots (particularly on the head and fore-body).

Clusters of these small spots merge in places to form dark patches, which in turn may group together to form a series of broken vertical bars along the body.

In common with many larger species of Grouper, the caudal fin is slightly rounded.

At the front of the fish is the characteristic cavernous mouth, lined with rows of small, backward pointing, needle-like teeth.

The Brown-Marbled Grouper can be found at both shallow, inshore reef areas such as Mae Haad/Koh Ma reef as all of the deeper offshore locations such as Sail Rock.

Despite its size, the Brown-Marbled Grouper is rather shy and can only be approached slowly and with as little noise as possible.

In most areas, it appears they lead a generally solitary life, with larger individuals appearing to occupy a specific, possibly overlapping, territory.

It is estimated that the largest specimens may reach an age of 40 years or more.

Reaching a maximum length of around 120cm, the impressive Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) is one of the largest Grouper species in the area, second only to the Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus malabaricus) (although there has been at least one confirmed sighting of a Giant Grouper (Epinephelus lanceolatus).

Although its size alone makes identification relatively easy, the Brown-Marbled Grouper has other characteristics which make it one of the more recognizable local Groupers.

Relative to its length, the Brown-Marbled Grouper is also very thick set compared to many of its smaller relatives.

It typically has a brown to yellow/brown overall colour with numerous small brown/black spots (particularly on the head and fore-body).

Clusters of these small spots merge in places to form dark patches, which in turn may group together to form a series of broken vertical bars along the body.

In common with many larger species of Grouper, the caudal fin is slightly rounded.

At the front of the fish is the characteristic cavernous mouth, lined with rows of small, backward pointing, needle-like teeth.

The Brown-Marbled Grouper can be found at both shallow, inshore reef areas such as Mae Haad/Koh Ma reef as all of the deeper offshore locations such as Sail Rock.

Despite its size, the Brown-Marbled Grouper is rather shy and can only be approached slowly and with as little noise as possible.

In most areas, it appears they lead a generally solitary life, with larger individuals appearing to occupy a specific, possibly overlapping, territory.

It is estimated that the largest specimens may reach an age of 40 years or more.

Alan's picture
Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus Fuscoguttatus)

The cavernous mouth of the Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus Fuscoguttatus) with its rows of small, backward pointing teeth, is the last sight that many small reef creatures will see.
As with most Grouper species, the Brown-Marbled Grouper captures prey by opening its mouth rapidly, causing a vacuum which sucks the victim in.

Alan's picture
Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus Fuscoguttatus) with Glass Cleaner Shrimps (Urocaridella Antonbruunii)

This photo, taken at Sail Rock, shows a Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus Fuscoguttatus) that has entered a crevice inhabited by some

Alan's picture
Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus Fuscoguttatus)

This photo, taken at Sail Rock shows most of the distinguishing features of the Brown-Marbled Grouper (Epinephelus Fuscoguttatus).