Tag: Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus malabaricus)

The Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus malabaricus) is undoubtedly the largest Grouper species frequently encountered in local waters.

Growing to a maximum length of at least 1.5m, the Malabar Grouper is reasonably common at most of the deeper offshore locations such as Sail Rock and Chumphon Pinnacles, although it may venture into the shallower locations less occasionally.

Although Malabar Groupers have the ability to rapidly change their colour/pattern (a common trait amongst many fish species), their most common appearance is a mottled pale - dark grey colouration with numerous small dark spots on the body and fins.

They commonly have a number of large dark blotch markings which partially merge to form a series of broken, vertical bands

and have a distinctly rounded caudal fin.

With few (if any) natural predators, adult Malabar Groupers are one of the region's apex predators and, as with most members of the Grouper family, the have has a cavernous mouth capable of engulfing most of the resident reef creatures in the area.

Despite their size, they tend to be wary of divers, particularly in large groups, however they may be approached to within a short distance if done so as slowly and quietly as possible.

The Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus malabaricus) is undoubtedly the largest Grouper species frequently encountered in local waters.

Growing to a maximum length of at least 1.5m, the Malabar Grouper is reasonably common at most of the deeper offshore locations such as Sail Rock and Chumphon Pinnacles, although it may venture into the shallower locations less occasionally.

Although Malabar Groupers have the ability to rapidly change their colour/pattern (a common trait amongst many fish species), their most common appearance is a mottled pale - dark grey colouration with numerous small dark spots on the body and fins.

They commonly have a number of large dark blotch markings which partially merge to form a series of broken, vertical bands

and have a distinctly rounded caudal fin.

With few (if any) natural predators, adult Malabar Groupers are one of the region's apex predators and, as with most members of the Grouper family, the have has a cavernous mouth capable of engulfing most of the resident reef creatures in the area.

Despite their size, they tend to be wary of divers, particularly in large groups, however they may be approached to within a short distance if done so as slowly and quietly as possible.

Alan's picture
Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus Malabaricus)

The cavernous mouth of a Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus Malabaricus) photographed at Sail Rock.

Alan's picture
Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus Malabaricus)

A large Malabar Grouper (Epinephelus Malabaricus) seeks out the cleaning "services" of a Blue-Streak Cleaner Wr