Tag: Metallic Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Latifasciata)

The Metallic Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Latifasciata), also commonly known as the Wide-Barred Shrimpgoby, appears to be an uncommon species at the most frequently visited local dive and snorkelling sites.

Unlike most of its local relatives, it appears to prefer a depth range from 10 - 25m, possibly explaining its apparent scarcity

It has been found at depths greater than 20m at Sail Rock, which is perhaps a more suitable habitat for this species than the shallower inshore reef areas which host the largest abundance of local gobies.

The Metallic Shrimpgoby reaches a maximum length of between 13 - 16cm and is one of the most colourful species in the area.

There is little sexual dimporphism evident between male and female therefore it is a fairly easy species to identify.

Distinguishing markings include 3 - 4 broad dark bars on the body (which appear broader ventrally) with a thin diagonal bar below the eye.

There are numerous pale blue spots and lines on the head, with small orange spots continuing along the body (between the bars) and onto the second dorsal fin.

The first dorsal fin has redish, pale-edged spots, whilst the second dorsal fin has a prominent row of pale-edged, redish spots along the margin, very similar to those found on its close relative, the Red-Margin Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Rubrimarginata).

The ventral fins have pale yellow and blue lines between the rays, whilst the pectoral fins are transparent.

The anal and caudal fins have a tri-coloured margin comprising a narrow white edge, broad red second margin with narrow blue sub-margin.

The caudal fin itself is generally yellowish in colour, with a few small red and blue lines radiating outwards.

As with many of its locally occurring relatives, the Metallic Shrimpgoby lives in a symbiotic relationship with one or more Pistol Shrimps of the genus Alpheus.

The Metallic Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Latifasciata), also commonly known as the Wide-Barred Shrimpgoby, appears to be an uncommon species at the most frequently visited local dive and snorkelling sites.

Unlike most of its local relatives, it appears to prefer a depth range from 10 - 25m, possibly explaining its apparent scarcity

It has been found at depths greater than 20m at Sail Rock, which is perhaps a more suitable habitat for this species than the shallower inshore reef areas which host the largest abundance of local gobies.

The Metallic Shrimpgoby reaches a maximum length of between 13 - 16cm and is one of the most colourful species in the area.

There is little sexual dimporphism evident between male and female therefore it is a fairly easy species to identify.

Distinguishing markings include 3 - 4 broad dark bars on the body (which appear broader ventrally) with a thin diagonal bar below the eye.

There are numerous pale blue spots and lines on the head, with small orange spots continuing along the body (between the bars) and onto the second dorsal fin.

The first dorsal fin has redish, pale-edged spots, whilst the second dorsal fin has a prominent row of pale-edged, redish spots along the margin, very similar to those found on its close relative, the Red-Margin Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Rubrimarginata).

The ventral fins have pale yellow and blue lines between the rays, whilst the pectoral fins are transparent.

The anal and caudal fins have a tri-coloured margin comprising a narrow white edge, broad red second margin with narrow blue sub-margin.

The caudal fin itself is generally yellowish in colour, with a few small red and blue lines radiating outwards.

As with many of its locally occurring relatives, the Metallic Shrimpgoby lives in a symbiotic relationship with one or more Pistol Shrimps of the genus Alpheus.

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Metallic Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris latifasciata)

The Metallic Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris latifasciata), also commonly known as the Wide-Barred Shrimpgoby, is one of the most colourful species of Goby found in local waters.