Tag: Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides)

Growing to a maximum length of around 15cm, the Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) appears to be one of the less common species of "shrimpgoby" in local waters.

Unlike many of its frequently encountered relatives, which can be found in close proximity to shallow reefs, the Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby prefers a habitat consisting of a muddy/silty substrate such as that found around 50m to the seaward side of Mae Haad/Koh Ma reef.

As this type of habitat is usually far less rich in terms of marine life, it tends to attract fewer divers. Consequently, this may make the species appear less abundant than it actually is.

The Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby, unlike many Goby species, exhibits clear sexual dimorphism, with the male being a generally drab olive green to dark brown whilst the female is an altogether more colourful yellow/orange with numerous brown/orange bands along the body.

Despite their sexual dimorphism, both male and female do share certain characteristics such as the numerous small neon blue spots which are present over the whole body of the male, but in some cases are only present on the head and posterior area/caudal peduncle of the female.

The pectoral fins are transparent whilst the ventral fins are noticeably darker than the overall body colour

.

The tall, square-shaped dorsal fin is unmarked except for 2 - 4 prominent dark blue spots from which its common name is derived.

The second dorsal fin is generally the same colour as the first, although it has 3 - 4 thin, translucent lines running horizontally.

The anal fin is also similar in colour to the rest of the body, with the exception of a slightly darker margin.

The rays of the caudal(tail) fin match the overall body colour, although there may be neon blue lines present also.

The Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby rarely strays far from the tunnel it shares with its "partner" Pistol Shrimp(s) (Alpheus Sp.) making it difficult to view at close quarters, unless approached very cautiously.

Growing to a maximum length of around 15cm, the Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) appears to be one of the less common species of "shrimpgoby" in local waters.

Unlike many of its frequently encountered relatives, which can be found in close proximity to shallow reefs, the Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby prefers a habitat consisting of a muddy/silty substrate such as that found around 50m to the seaward side of Mae Haad/Koh Ma reef.

As this type of habitat is usually far less rich in terms of marine life, it tends to attract fewer divers. Consequently, this may make the species appear less abundant than it actually is.

The Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby, unlike many Goby species, exhibits clear sexual dimorphism, with the male being a generally drab olive green to dark brown whilst the female is an altogether more colourful yellow/orange with numerous brown/orange bands along the body.

Despite their sexual dimorphism, both male and female do share certain characteristics such as the numerous small neon blue spots which are present over the whole body of the male, but in some cases are only present on the head and posterior area/caudal peduncle of the female.

The pectoral fins are transparent whilst the ventral fins are noticeably darker than the overall body colour

.

The tall, square-shaped dorsal fin is unmarked except for 2 - 4 prominent dark blue spots from which its common name is derived.

The second dorsal fin is generally the same colour as the first, although it has 3 - 4 thin, translucent lines running horizontally.

The anal fin is also similar in colour to the rest of the body, with the exception of a slightly darker margin.

The rays of the caudal(tail) fin match the overall body colour, although there may be neon blue lines present also.

The Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby rarely strays far from the tunnel it shares with its "partner" Pistol Shrimp(s) (Alpheus Sp.) making it difficult to view at close quarters, unless approached very cautiously.

Alan's picture
Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) - Male

The "resident" male Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) emerges from a cloud of silt created by one of its "partner" Alpheid Shrimps.

Alan's picture
Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) - Male

This photograph of a male Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides), taken at Mae Haad/Koh Ma clearly shows the significant difference between the sexes in terms of colouration and markin

Alan's picture
Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) - Female

This photograph of a female Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides), taken at Mae Haad/Koh Ma shows the features unique to the female of the species, as well as those shared by both mal