Tag: Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina Nigrivirgata)

The Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina nigrivirgata) is a seemingly common species that appears to have quite specific habitat requirements.

Whilst the species appears to be abundant at particular sites, it may be completely absent in others. Evidence of this population dynamic is even apparent within individual locations such as Mae Haad/Koh Ma.

At this shallow (average depth approximately 8m), sheltered bay, with its offshore reef running parallel to the shore-lne, the Black-Line Shrimp Goby can be found in large numbers only from the mid point to the Northern area of the bay where the substrate is predominately fine sand, becoming silty as the depth increases.

In contrast, the substrate in the area from the middle of the bay, extending Southward, increasingly consists of course sand and rubble. Although the topography and depth is very consistent across the bay, this Goby species seems to be almost completely absent towards the South.

Although this species exhibits a couple of colour/pattern variations, it is generally easy to identify. The most common colouration is a pale grey/whitish body with a single dark brown/black line that extends from the base of the caudal (tail) fin to the eye (extending through the eye).

Body markings include yellow spots on the head and pelvic fins, yellow lines on the pelvic fins, with 4-5 narrow yellow lines also running horizontally along the body on some individuals.

There may be neon blue lines on the dorsal and caudal fin rays, particularly on the caudal fin.

The pectoral fins appear translucent while the base colour of the anal and dorsal fins matches the body colouration.

Some individuals may exhibit narrow bands that transect the dark brown/black band along the body. These appear to consist of two groups of approximately four bands each. The anterior group of bands tend to be at an oblique angle below the first dorsal fin, whereas the posterior group, which are present between the anterior and posterior origins of the anal fin, are in a more vertical orientation.

The second distinct (albeit seemingly less common) variation that may be found has an overall yellow/golden colouration. At this point i'm not entirely sure if this is a variation within the species, or simply and example of sexual dimorphism.

The Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina nigrivirgata) is a seemingly common species that appears to have quite specific habitat requirements.

Whilst the species appears to be abundant at particular sites, it may be completely absent in others. Evidence of this population dynamic is even apparent within individual locations such as Mae Haad/Koh Ma.

At this shallow (average depth approximately 8m), sheltered bay, with its offshore reef running parallel to the shore-lne, the Black-Line Shrimp Goby can be found in large numbers only from the mid point to the Northern area of the bay where the substrate is predominately fine sand, becoming silty as the depth increases.

In contrast, the substrate in the area from the middle of the bay, extending Southward, increasingly consists of course sand and rubble. Although the topography and depth is very consistent across the bay, this Goby species seems to be almost completely absent towards the South.

Although this species exhibits a couple of colour/pattern variations, it is generally easy to identify. The most common colouration is a pale grey/whitish body with a single dark brown/black line that extends from the base of the caudal (tail) fin to the eye (extending through the eye).

Body markings include yellow spots on the head and pelvic fins, yellow lines on the pelvic fins, with 4-5 narrow yellow lines also running horizontally along the body on some individuals.

There may be neon blue lines on the dorsal and caudal fin rays, particularly on the caudal fin.

The pectoral fins appear translucent while the base colour of the anal and dorsal fins matches the body colouration.

Some individuals may exhibit narrow bands that transect the dark brown/black band along the body. These appear to consist of two groups of approximately four bands each. The anterior group of bands tend to be at an oblique angle below the first dorsal fin, whereas the posterior group, which are present between the anterior and posterior origins of the anal fin, are in a more vertical orientation.

The second distinct (albeit seemingly less common) variation that may be found has an overall yellow/golden colouration. At this point i'm not entirely sure if this is a variation within the species, or simply and example of sexual dimorphism.

Alan's picture
Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina Nigrivirgata) - Variation 2

This Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina nigrivirgata), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, also shows the "typical" colouration for locally occurring specimens, although the narrow bands that occasionally t

Alan's picture
Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina Nigrivirgata) - Variation 1

This Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina nigrivirgata), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, shows the "typical" colouration for specimens in local waters.