Tag: Blue Hana Goby (Ptereleotris Hanae)

The Blue Hana Goby (Ptereleotris Hanae) is another of the slender-bodied gobies which, although not uncommon, are very difficult to photograph due to their shape and timid nature.

Although they can be seen darting into burrows inhabited by Alpheid Shrimps, they do not share a symbiotic relationship such as that formed between the Alpheid Shrimps and many species of "Shrimp-Goby" (Amblyeleotris sp.).

Growing to a maximum length of around 12cm, the Blue Hana Goby is distinguished by its overall pale blue/grayish colouration. There are a pair of neon blue markings on the operculum (the bony cover which protects the gills).

Perhaps the most distinctive feature of this species are the filaments which trail from the rear edge of the caudal fin. These filaments are particularly prominent in adults.

Blue Hana Gobies can be found at most local sites, particularly the shallower inshore areas which have gradually sloping, sandy substrates.

They are usually found in pairs and although they can be approached cautiously to within a meter or two, any sudden movement will see them dash into their burrow.

The Blue Hana Goby (Ptereleotris Hanae) is another of the slender-bodied gobies which, although not uncommon, are very difficult to photograph due to their shape and timid nature.

Although they can be seen darting into burrows inhabited by Alpheid Shrimps, they do not share a symbiotic relationship such as that formed between the Alpheid Shrimps and many species of "Shrimp-Goby" (Amblyeleotris sp.).

Growing to a maximum length of around 12cm, the Blue Hana Goby is distinguished by its overall pale blue/grayish colouration. There are a pair of neon blue markings on the operculum (the bony cover which protects the gills).

Perhaps the most distinctive feature of this species are the filaments which trail from the rear edge of the caudal fin. These filaments are particularly prominent in adults.

Blue Hana Gobies can be found at most local sites, particularly the shallower inshore areas which have gradually sloping, sandy substrates.

They are usually found in pairs and although they can be approached cautiously to within a meter or two, any sudden movement will see them dash into their burrow.

Alan's picture
Blue Hana Goby (Ptereleotris Hanae)

A pretty bad photo of a Blue Hana Goby (Ptereleotris hanae) at Mae Haad/Koh Ma reef.