Tag: Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Sp.)

The Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Sp.) has turned out to be a bit of an enigma...

The main reference book i use clearly identifies this pale/brown variation, although only as falling within the family Cryptocentrus. It doesn't list a specific species name for it.

It also states that the main identifying features are the two dark spots on the cheek area, with two more dark spots further back on the head (these are clear in the photo of the pale/brown variation).

However, it goes on to say that regardless of any other colour variation within this species, these "dark spots" are ALWAYS present.

On a dive at Sail Rock, around 30m i found what i thought initially was a common, yellow variation of the Banded Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Cinctus). Looking closer, it seemed to be lacking the distinctive blue spots of that species, so i took some photos of it.

A closer inspection of these photos shows that the yellow goby in this gallery is almost identical to the Ventral-Barred goby, except that it lacks the "dark spots" on the face (which the book suggested should ALWAYS be present).

The Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Sp.) has turned out to be a bit of an enigma...

The main reference book i use clearly identifies this pale/brown variation, although only as falling within the family Cryptocentrus. It doesn't list a specific species name for it.

It also states that the main identifying features are the two dark spots on the cheek area, with two more dark spots further back on the head (these are clear in the photo of the pale/brown variation).

However, it goes on to say that regardless of any other colour variation within this species, these "dark spots" are ALWAYS present.

On a dive at Sail Rock, around 30m i found what i thought initially was a common, yellow variation of the Banded Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Cinctus). Looking closer, it seemed to be lacking the distinctive blue spots of that species, so i took some photos of it.

A closer inspection of these photos shows that the yellow goby in this gallery is almost identical to the Ventral-Barred goby, except that it lacks the "dark spots" on the face (which the book suggested should ALWAYS be present).

Alan's picture
Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby - Pale/Brown Variation (Cryptocentrus sp.) with Alpheid Shrimp

A Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus sp.) stands guard at the entrance to the tunnel it shares with this Alpheid aka Pistol Shrimp (Alpheus Sp.) on the seaward side of Mae Haad ree

Alan's picture
Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby - Yellow/Brown Variation (Cryptocentrus sp.)

Another variation of the fairly common Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus sp.).

Alan's picture
Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby - Pale/Brown Variation (Cryptocentrus sp.) with Tiger Pistol Shrimp (Alpheus Bellulus)

This photo of the pale/brown variation of Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus sp.), taken at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, clearly shows the similarity of the shape and markings of the fins when compared with those of the

Alan's picture
Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby - Yellow Variation (Cryptocentrus sp.)

This is a photo of what i'm certain is a yellow-variant Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus sp.), found at a depth of around 25m at Sail Rock.

Alan's picture
Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby - Pale/Brown Variation (Cryptocentrus sp.)

The Pale/Brown Variation of the Ventral-Barred Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus sp.), photographed at Sail Rock is easily identified by the two dark marks on the cheek, and two more slightly further back on the