Tag: Yellow Boxfish (Ostracion Cubicus)

Yellow Boxfish (Ostracion Cubicus), as the name suggests, can be easily reconised by their box-like body shape. They have hexagonal shaped, plate-like scales which are fused together to form the "box" structure from which their fins protrude.

Whilst adults have a rather dull blueish/grey colouration, it is the juveniles which are much sought after due to their amazing yellow with black "polka-dot" pattern.

Individuals in the juvenile/yellow phase are much more commonly seen (unsurprisingly!!) even though they tend to be less than 10-15cm in length, whereas the less distinct adults can reach a maximum length of approximately 45cm.

As with all species in this section, Yellow Boxfish swim in a very untypical manner, using their pectoral fins to create a "paddling" movement.

Yellow Boxfish feed mainly on algae, they will also feed on sponges, small crustaceans and molluscs.

Yellow Boxfish (Ostracion Cubicus), as the name suggests, can be easily reconised by their box-like body shape. They have hexagonal shaped, plate-like scales which are fused together to form the "box" structure from which their fins protrude.

Whilst adults have a rather dull blueish/grey colouration, it is the juveniles which are much sought after due to their amazing yellow with black "polka-dot" pattern.

Individuals in the juvenile/yellow phase are much more commonly seen (unsurprisingly!!) even though they tend to be less than 10-15cm in length, whereas the less distinct adults can reach a maximum length of approximately 45cm.

As with all species in this section, Yellow Boxfish swim in a very untypical manner, using their pectoral fins to create a "paddling" movement.

Yellow Boxfish feed mainly on algae, they will also feed on sponges, small crustaceans and molluscs.

Alan's picture
Yellow Boxfish juvenile (Ostracion Cubicus)

This very small juvenile Yellow Boxfish (Ostracion Cubicus) was first seen at Sail Rock around mid-late January 2011.

Alan's picture
Yellow Boxfish juvenile (Ostracion Cubicus)

Always a favourite with divers, the juvenile Yellow Boxfish (Ostracion Cubicus), photographed here at Sail Rock, comes high on most people's list for cutest or strangest marine species.