Tag: Benthic

This section contains marine species that live, or are most active in the

Benthic zone

where "Benthic" is generally be classified as the "bottom layer of a body of water"

Whilst true Benthic species such as Stingrays are almost confined to the sea floor, a large variety of species classed as Demersal fish are included also.

Demersal fish differ slightly from "true" Benthic species in that whilst they are active on the sea floor, they may inhabit other areas such as coral reefs.

A very good example of a Demersal species are the members of the Goatfish (Mullidae) family. This family spend almost all of their active life foraging for food on the sea floor, with their downward facing mouths and chemo-sensory "barbels" probing the sand for small invertibrates. However, when not foraging, it is a very common sight to find certain species resting on top of large coral formations within the reef zone

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This section contains marine species that live, or are most active in the

Benthic zone

where "Benthic" is generally be classified as the "bottom layer of a body of water"

Whilst true Benthic species such as Stingrays are almost confined to the sea floor, a large variety of species classed as Demersal fish are included also.

Demersal fish differ slightly from "true" Benthic species in that whilst they are active on the sea floor, they may inhabit other areas such as coral reefs.

A very good example of a Demersal species are the members of the Goatfish (Mullidae) family. This family spend almost all of their active life foraging for food on the sea floor, with their downward facing mouths and chemo-sensory "barbels" probing the sand for small invertibrates. However, when not foraging, it is a very common sight to find certain species resting on top of large coral formations within the reef zone

.
Alan's picture
Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina Nigrivirgata) - Variation 2

This Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina nigrivirgata), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, also shows the "typical" colouration for locally occurring specimens, although the narrow bands that occasionally t

Alan's picture
Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina Nigrivirgata) - Variation 1

This Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina nigrivirgata), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, shows the "typical" colouration for specimens in local waters.

Alan's picture
Banded Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Cinctus) - Yellow and Dark Variations

This photograph from Tanote Bay, Koh Tao shows the fairly uncommon combination of both the yellow/gold and darker brown variations of Banded Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus cinctus) together.

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Lagoon Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Cyanotaenia)

This Lagoon Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus cyanotaenia), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma reef, shows yet another slight colour variation.

Alan's picture
High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus) - female

This High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus), probably a female due to the relatively short first dorsal spines, was patrolling a small, sparsely weeded area just beside Chaloklum pier.

Alan's picture
High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus)

A male High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus) keeps a watchful eye on its surroundings from the relative safety of disused oyster shell beneath Chaloklum pier

Alan's picture
Jewelled Blenny (Salarias Fasciatus)

The Jewelled Blenny (Salarias Fasciatus), such as this one photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, is one of the largest species of Blenny found in local waters.

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Grey Bonnet Snail (Phalium Glaucum)

The individual in this photograph was one of two relatively large Grey Bonnet Snails (Phalium Glaucum) found on the open sand area approximately 100 - 200m from Chaloklum pier.

Alan's picture
Black Nudibranch (Dendrodoris Nigra)

A Black Nudibranch (Dendrodoris Nigra) photographed beneath Chaloklum pier.

Alan's picture
Black Nudibranch (Dendrodoris Nigra)

A Black Nudibranch (Dendrodoris Nigra) photographed beneath Chaloklum pier.