Tag: Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus)

A common member of the Tetradontidae family, and reaching a maximum length of around 65cm, the Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus) is a shy species which spends the majority of daylight hours hiding beneath large rocks or coral formations.

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It becomes far more active after dark, during which time it can be found foraging for its main food such as crustaceans and molluscs.

This species is easily identified by the presence of several large, yellow-edged blotches and numerous small spines. These backward-facing defensive spines lay flat against the body of the animal unless it is provoked into inflating its body, in which case they stand out vertically from the body.

A common member of the Tetradontidae family, and reaching a maximum length of around 65cm, the Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus) is a shy species which spends the majority of daylight hours hiding beneath large rocks or coral formations.

.

It becomes far more active after dark, during which time it can be found foraging for its main food such as crustaceans and molluscs.

This species is easily identified by the presence of several large, yellow-edged blotches and numerous small spines. These backward-facing defensive spines lay flat against the body of the animal unless it is provoked into inflating its body, in which case they stand out vertically from the body.

Alan's picture
Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus)

A pair of approachable Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus) photographed beneath Chaloklum pier.

Alan's picture
Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus)

Although often quite shy, this Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus) photographed beneath Chaloklum pier seemed very relaxed when approached.

Alan's picture
Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus)

A close-up of a Black-Blotched Porcupinefish (Diodon Liturosus) clearly showing the fused plates which form the mouth and large eyes indicative of a primarily nocturnal species.