Tag: Threadfin Breams (Nemipteridae)

The Threadfin Breams (Nemipteridae) also known as Whiptail Breams or Spine-Cheeks are a family consisting of 62 species within 5 genera.

Most species are benthic feeders with a diet consisting mainly of small crustaceans, cephalopods or small fish, although a few species feed on plankton.

The species found in local waters are usually found individually or in small groups.

As primarily benthic feeders, it is not uncommon to have a few individuals approaching student divers as they are busy practicing skills whilst settled on a sandy bottom at the shallower locations.

Students practicing skills are more likely to be stirring up the bottom and therefore exposing easy food sources for these opportunistic fish.

The Threadfin Breams (Nemipteridae) also known as Whiptail Breams or Spine-Cheeks are a family consisting of 62 species within 5 genera.

Most species are benthic feeders with a diet consisting mainly of small crustaceans, cephalopods or small fish, although a few species feed on plankton.

The species found in local waters are usually found individually or in small groups.

As primarily benthic feeders, it is not uncommon to have a few individuals approaching student divers as they are busy practicing skills whilst settled on a sandy bottom at the shallower locations.

Students practicing skills are more likely to be stirring up the bottom and therefore exposing easy food sources for these opportunistic fish.

Alan's picture
Pearly Monocle Bream juvenile (Scolopsis Margaritifer) 2

Although i'm not 100% sure, i think there's a good chance this is a juvenile Pearly Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Margaritifer). It was probably the smallest one i've seen and the markings are more distinct (the dark spot on the dorsal fin is interesting too).
This was at Shark Island, Koh Tao.

Alan's picture
Pearly Monocle Bream juvenile (Scolopsis Margaritifer) 1

A juvenile/sub-adult Pearly Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Margaritifer) displaying the three seperate colour tones which will eventually merge as the fish matures.

Alan's picture
Pearly Monocle Bream adult (Scolopsis Margaritifer)

This rather grainy photo shows the two iridescent blue lines between the eyes and snout which is one of the characteristics of the Pearly Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Margaritifer).

Alan's picture
Pearly Monocle Bream adult (Scolopsis Margaritifer) 1

An adult Pearly Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Margaritifer), one of the most common species found in small groups around all local reef areas. These are also present at the deeper, offshore sites where they tend to be seen individually.

Alan's picture
White-Streak Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Ciliatus) 1

One of the most common members of the Scolopsis family found in local waters, the easily identified (and photographed) White-Streak Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Ciliatus).

Alan's picture
White-Cheek Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Vosmeri) 2

This front-on view of a Whitecheek Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Vosmeri) shows the boney, duck-like mouth which is a common feature within the Scolopsis family and is characteristic of many benthic feading species.

Alan's picture
White-Cheek Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Vosmeri)

An adult Whitecheek Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Vosmeri), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, clearly showing all of the distinguishing features of the species.

Alan's picture
Bridled Monocle Bream juvenile (Scolopsis Bilineatus)

In this photo of a juvenile Bridled Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Bilineatus), photographed at Shark Island, both the similarities and differences between it and the adult are easy to see.

Alan's picture
Bridled Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Bilineatus) adult

This is a rather grainy image taken in low light at Sail Rock, however the markings which make the Bridled Monocle Bream (Scolopsis Bilineatus) easily identifiable are clearly visible.