Tag: High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes mitratus)

Growing to around 10cm in length the High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes mitratus) has many common name variations, the most frequent being Floral Blenny, Floral Fang-Blenny, Helmeted Blenny, or the Crested Sabretooth Blenny.

This species belongs to the Combtooth Blenny family, the largest single group within the Blenniidae family (consisting of 371 species within 53 genera).

The High-Finned Blenny belongs within the genus Petroscirtes which contains 11 separate species. As with all other members of the genus, this species is armed with a pair of long grooved fangs in the lower jaw which are attached to a venom gland. These fangs are used defensively if harassed.

Living mainly on gravel substrates or within clumps of sargassum algae, it also appears at the deeper offshore sites where it can be found on mooring lines with algal growth.

The High-Finned Blenny is distinguished by its olive green colouration, often with redish spots along the side, and tall "mast" at the front of the dorsal fin.

Growing to around 10cm in length the High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes mitratus) has many common name variations, the most frequent being Floral Blenny, Floral Fang-Blenny, Helmeted Blenny, or the Crested Sabretooth Blenny.

This species belongs to the Combtooth Blenny family, the largest single group within the Blenniidae family (consisting of 371 species within 53 genera).

The High-Finned Blenny belongs within the genus Petroscirtes which contains 11 separate species. As with all other members of the genus, this species is armed with a pair of long grooved fangs in the lower jaw which are attached to a venom gland. These fangs are used defensively if harassed.

Living mainly on gravel substrates or within clumps of sargassum algae, it also appears at the deeper offshore sites where it can be found on mooring lines with algal growth.

The High-Finned Blenny is distinguished by its olive green colouration, often with redish spots along the side, and tall "mast" at the front of the dorsal fin.

Alan's picture
High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus) - female

This High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus), probably a female due to the relatively short first dorsal spines, was patrolling a small, sparsely weeded area just beside Chaloklum pier.

Alan's picture
High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus)

A male High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus) keeps a watchful eye on its surroundings from the relative safety of disused oyster shell beneath Chaloklum pier

Alan's picture
High-Finned Blenny juvenile (Petroscirtes Mitratus)

Another tiny juvenile High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes mitratus), this time photographed on a mooring line at Sail Rock.

Although not a great photo, the rope gives a good indication of just how small this little Blenny is.

Alan's picture
High-Finned Blenny juvenile (Petroscirtes Mitratus)

A juvenile High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes mitratus) showing the same colouration as the adult, however it is lacking the mast-like, high dorsal fin which will develop as it matures.

Alan's picture
High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus)

A High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes Mitratus) hiding behind a small patch of weeds.