Tag: Short-Head Sabretooth Blenny (Petroscirtes breviceps)

Growing to around 10cm in length, the Short-Head Sabretooth Blenny (Petroscirtes breviceps) belongs within the genus Petroscirtes which contains 11 separate species.

As with all other members of the genus, this species is armed with a pair of long grooved fangs in the lower jaw which are attached to a venom gland. These fangs are used defensively if harassed.

Short-Head Sabretooth Blennies are found in similar habitation to their close relative, the High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes mitratus) ie. on reef flats with gravel substrates or within clumps of sargassum algae. Similarly, they also appear at the deeper offshore sites where they can be found on mooring lines with algal growth.

This species is distinguished by a broad dark band running through the eye from snout to caudal fin. Base colouration is variable and the dark band may appear less solid in some individuals.

Growing to around 10cm in length, the Short-Head Sabretooth Blenny (Petroscirtes breviceps) belongs within the genus Petroscirtes which contains 11 separate species.

As with all other members of the genus, this species is armed with a pair of long grooved fangs in the lower jaw which are attached to a venom gland. These fangs are used defensively if harassed.

Short-Head Sabretooth Blennies are found in similar habitation to their close relative, the High-Finned Blenny (Petroscirtes mitratus) ie. on reef flats with gravel substrates or within clumps of sargassum algae. Similarly, they also appear at the deeper offshore sites where they can be found on mooring lines with algal growth.

This species is distinguished by a broad dark band running through the eye from snout to caudal fin. Base colouration is variable and the dark band may appear less solid in some individuals.

Alan's picture
Short-Head Sabretooth Blenny (Petroscirtes Breviceps)

The Short-Head Sabretooth Blenny (Petroscirtes Breviceps) in most common at shallow, protected reef flats or among clumps of sargassum algae.

However, as this photo taken at Sail Rock shows, they can sometimes be found at deeper, offshore sites on mooring lines that have a reasonable overgrowth of algae.