Tag: Corals and Anemones (Anthozoa)

Although related to the free-swimming, gelatinous "jellyfish" under the phylum Cnidaria, the species contained within this gallery are very different in appearance.

Corals and Sea Anemones differ mainly from other Cnidarians in that they do not experience a "medusa" stage in their development.

Most Corals form colonies of polyps which are structurally similar to Anemones, although considerably smaller.

Anthozoa can be divided into two separate sub-classes which are:

  • Hexacorallia - contains the hard, stoney reef-building Corals, the Sea Anemones and the tube dwelling Anemones.
  • Octocorallia - includes the "soft Corals", Sea Pens, Whip Corals and Sea Fans (Gorgonians).

Although related to the free-swimming, gelatinous "jellyfish" under the phylum Cnidaria, the species contained within this gallery are very different in appearance.

Corals and Sea Anemones differ mainly from other Cnidarians in that they do not experience a "medusa" stage in their development.

Most Corals form colonies of polyps which are structurally similar to Anemones, although considerably smaller.

Anthozoa can be divided into two separate sub-classes which are:

  • Hexacorallia - contains the hard, stoney reef-building Corals, the Sea Anemones and the tube dwelling Anemones.
  • Octocorallia - includes the "soft Corals", Sea Pens, Whip Corals and Sea Fans (Gorgonians).
Alan's picture
Saddleback Anemonefish (Amphiprion polymnus) and Haddon's Carpet Anemone (Stichodactyla haddoni)

A pair of adult Saddleback Anemonefish (Amphiprion polymnus) keep a watchful eye on a single tiny juvenile.

Although tiny, it is possible to see the lighter colouration of the juvenile when compared to the two adults.