Tag: Sharks, Skates and Rays (Elasmobranchii)

Elasmobranchii is one of the two subclasses of cartilaginous fish in the class Chondrichthyes, the other being Holocephali (Chimaeras).

The main features that set Elasmobranchs apart from the vast majority of other fish groups are the lack of a swim bladder, a cartilaginous skeleton and skin comprising tiny "tooth-like" structures called dermal denticles, rather than the typical scales found on most other fish species.

Due to the relatively small number of species found in local waters, i decided to group the sharks, skates and rays together.

I've also added the family group to all three categories (Reef, Pelagic and Benthic) as there are species which inhabit one particular zone but not the others eg. Stingrays are obviously Benthic whilst Whale Sharks are typically Pelagic.

Elasmobranchii is one of the two subclasses of cartilaginous fish in the class Chondrichthyes, the other being Holocephali (Chimaeras).

The main features that set Elasmobranchs apart from the vast majority of other fish groups are the lack of a swim bladder, a cartilaginous skeleton and skin comprising tiny "tooth-like" structures called dermal denticles, rather than the typical scales found on most other fish species.

Due to the relatively small number of species found in local waters, i decided to group the sharks, skates and rays together.

I've also added the family group to all three categories (Reef, Pelagic and Benthic) as there are species which inhabit one particular zone but not the others eg. Stingrays are obviously Benthic whilst Whale Sharks are typically Pelagic.

Alan's picture
Jenkins Whiptail Ray (Himantura Jenkinsii)

I came across this very large and equally uncommon ray during a very enjoyable dive at Aow Mao Bay, Koh Tao.

Although i can't be 100% certain, the most likely candidate is the Jenkins Whiptail Ray (Himantura Jenkinsii).

Alan's picture
Jenkins Whiptail Ray (Himantura Jenkinsii)

This Sting-Ray was photographed at Sail Rock, laying on the bottom at a depth of around 25m. Although it is most likely to be a member of the "Whiptail" genus (Himantura), i've not been able to identify exactly what species it is.

Alan's picture
Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray (Neotrygon Kuhlii)

A Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray (Neotrygon Kuhlii) resting below an over-hanging rock at Angthong Marine Park.