Tag: Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray (Neotrygon Kuhlii)

The Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray (Neotrygon Kuhlii) is one of the most common and easily identified members of the Stingray (Dasyatidae) family found in local waters.

Often found sheltering below large corals and rocky outcrops during daytime, the Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray becomes far more active during the night when it moves out onto sandy reef flats in search of the benthic crustaceans, molluscs and small boney fish which make up the majority of its diet.

The Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray has 1 or 2 venomous, barbed spines in the tail which are used in self defense when threatened.

This species is moderately sized compared to many of its relatives, growing to a maximum size of approximately 35cm across the "disc" and around 80cm total length.

Due to its striking appearance of bright, neon blue spots on a yellowish body, with 2 similarly coloured stripes along the tail, this is one of the favourite species for divers, snorkellers and photographers.

The Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray (Neotrygon Kuhlii) is one of the most common and easily identified members of the Stingray (Dasyatidae) family found in local waters.

Often found sheltering below large corals and rocky outcrops during daytime, the Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray becomes far more active during the night when it moves out onto sandy reef flats in search of the benthic crustaceans, molluscs and small boney fish which make up the majority of its diet.

The Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray has 1 or 2 venomous, barbed spines in the tail which are used in self defense when threatened.

This species is moderately sized compared to many of its relatives, growing to a maximum size of approximately 35cm across the "disc" and around 80cm total length.

Due to its striking appearance of bright, neon blue spots on a yellowish body, with 2 similarly coloured stripes along the tail, this is one of the favourite species for divers, snorkellers and photographers.

Alan's picture
Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray (Neotrygon Kuhlii)

A Blue-Spotted Ribbontail Ray (Neotrygon Kuhlii) resting below an over-hanging rock at Angthong Marine Park.