Tag: Areolate Grouper (Epinephelus areolatus)

The Areolate Grouper (Epinephelus Areolatus) is possibly more common in local waters than its appearances would suggest.

Unlike most of its locally occurring relatives, this species tends to be found in areas of silt and sediment rather than on or around the coral reefs.

At deeper offshore sites such as Sail Rock it has been observed on the bottom, some distance from the main rock itself, at depths of around 40m. It is rarely, if ever, seen on the main rock which is abundantly populated by various other Grouper species.

It can frequently be found in the dark, silty area under Chaloklum pier at a depth of less than 3m!

Another trait which sets this species apart from its local relatives is that it is unusually curious and has been seen to approach or even follow divers.

Growing to a maximum length of around 40cm, the Areolate Grouper is fairly easy to identify. It has a generally pale colouration with close-set brownish/yellow spots on the body and smaller spots on the fins.

The main characteristic of this species is the distinctive white margin on the posterior edge of the caudal fin.

*Note: since almost all other local members of the Serranidae family fall easily into the "Reef" category, i have included this species here as well, although there is probably a good argument for it to be included in the "Benthic" group.

The Areolate Grouper (Epinephelus Areolatus) is possibly more common in local waters than its appearances would suggest.

Unlike most of its locally occurring relatives, this species tends to be found in areas of silt and sediment rather than on or around the coral reefs.

At deeper offshore sites such as Sail Rock it has been observed on the bottom, some distance from the main rock itself, at depths of around 40m. It is rarely, if ever, seen on the main rock which is abundantly populated by various other Grouper species.

It can frequently be found in the dark, silty area under Chaloklum pier at a depth of less than 3m!

Another trait which sets this species apart from its local relatives is that it is unusually curious and has been seen to approach or even follow divers.

Growing to a maximum length of around 40cm, the Areolate Grouper is fairly easy to identify. It has a generally pale colouration with close-set brownish/yellow spots on the body and smaller spots on the fins.

The main characteristic of this species is the distinctive white margin on the posterior edge of the caudal fin.

*Note: since almost all other local members of the Serranidae family fall easily into the "Reef" category, i have included this species here as well, although there is probably a good argument for it to be included in the "Benthic" group.

Alan's picture
Areolate Grouper juvenile (Epinephelus Areolatus)

This tiny juvenile Grouper is almost certainly an Areolate Grouper (Epinephelus Areolatus) as the distinctive white margin on the caudal fin suggests.

Alan's picture
Areolate Grouper (Epinephelus Areolatus)

This Areolate Grouper (Epinephelus Areolatus) was photographed at a depth of around 40m at Sail Rock.

Alan's picture
Areolate Grouper (Epinephelus areolatus)

An Areolate Grouper (Epinephelus areolatus) showing its distinctive features ie: brownish/yellow spots on an overall pale body and in particular, the white margin at the rear of the caudal fin.