Tag: Groupers, Anthias, Soapfish, etc. (Serranidae)

Alan's picture
Duskytail Grouper (Epinephelus Bleekeri)

In this photograph of a Duskytail Grouper (Epinephelus Bleekeri), photographed on the outer reef slope at Mae Haad/Koh Ma reef, the translucent pectoral fin, unmarked anal fin and the yellow/blueish colouration of the

Alan's picture
White-Streaked Grouper (Epinephelus Ongus)

This photograph of an adult White-Streaked Grouper (Epinephelus Ongus) at Sail Rock clearly shows the main distinguishing features of the species in local waters eg.

Alan's picture
White-Streaked Grouper (Epinephelus Ongus)

This photograph shows a paler-coloured adult White-Streaked Grouper (Epinephelus Ongus) at Mae Haad/Koh Ma.

Alan's picture
White-Streaked Grouper (Epinephelus Ongus)

An adult White-Streaked Grouper (Epinephelus Ongus) shares a crevice with a Redcoat Squirrelfish (Sargocentron Rubrum) at Sail Rock.

Alan's picture
Tomato Grouper (Cephalopholis Sonnerati) with Glass-Cleaner Shrimps(Urocaridella Antonbruunii)

This photo shows the smaller (possibly female) Tomato Grouper (Cephalopholis sonnerati) enjoying the attention of some Glass-Cleaner Shrimps (Urocaridella antonbruunii) in a crevice close to the South-East corner of

Alan's picture
Tomato Grouper (Cephalopholis Sonnerati)

This photo shows the larger (possibly male) Tomato Grouper (Cephalopholis sonnerati) that resides around the South-East corner of Sail Rock, at a depth of around 18m.

Alan's picture
Tomato Grouper (Cephalopholis Sonnerati)

The Tomato Grouper (Cephalopholis sonnerati) in this photo is one of a very small number of "resident" individuals that can be found at Sail Rock.

Alan's picture
Red-Bar Anthias (Pseudanthias Rubrizonatus) - Male

The male Red-Bar Anthias (Pseudanthias rubrizonatus) is far more recognizable and easy to identify than the female, although due to the small size of the species and their preference for deeper locations such as the

Alan's picture
Red-Bar Anthias (Pseudanthias Rubrizonatus) - Male

Another photograph of the colourful male Red-Bar Anthias (Pseudanthias rubrizonatus)

Alan's picture
Red-Bar Anthias (Pseudanthias Rubrizonatus) - Male

This photograph of the male Red-Bar Anthias (Pseudanthias rubrizonatus) clearly shows the filaments trailing from the upper and lower corners of the caudal (tail) fin, which is the main anatomical difference between males and females of the species.