Tag: Long-Beaked Coralfish (Chelmon Rostratus)

The Long-Beaked Coralfish (Chelmon Rostratus) is one of the most common species of Butterflyfish in the area, particularly in the shallow inshore reef areas, although they are also found in smaller numbers at deeper sites such as Sail Rock, Koh Phangan.

Reaching a length of up to 20cm, the Long-Beaked Coralfish is easily identified with its extended snout, golden/copper coloured vertical bands on an overall silvery/white body and "oscellated spot" or "false eye" on the rear of the dorsal fin.

Adults are usually found in pairs at all locations whilst very small juveniles tend to be found individually in shallow, sheltered areas (below Chaloklum pier seems to be a favourite location for juveniles!).

,p>If approached cautiously, this species makes an excellent subject for photographs.

The Long-Beaked Coralfish (Chelmon Rostratus) is one of the most common species of Butterflyfish in the area, particularly in the shallow inshore reef areas, although they are also found in smaller numbers at deeper sites such as Sail Rock, Koh Phangan.

Reaching a length of up to 20cm, the Long-Beaked Coralfish is easily identified with its extended snout, golden/copper coloured vertical bands on an overall silvery/white body and "oscellated spot" or "false eye" on the rear of the dorsal fin.

Adults are usually found in pairs at all locations whilst very small juveniles tend to be found individually in shallow, sheltered areas (below Chaloklum pier seems to be a favourite location for juveniles!).

,p>If approached cautiously, this species makes an excellent subject for photographs.

Alan's picture
Long-Beaked Coralfish juvenile (Chelmon Rostratus)

This tiny, juvenile Long-Beaked Coralfish (Chelmon Rostratus) was photographed under Chaloklum pier.

Alan's picture
Long-Beaked Coralfish (Chelmon Rostratus)

An adult Long-Beaked Coralfish (Chelmon Rostratus) searches for food beneath Chaloklum pier.

Alan's picture
Long-Beaked Coralfish (Chelmon Rostratus)

Long-Beaked Coralfish (Chelmon rostratus) are one of the most common reef fish in the area and always popular with divers and snorkellers (especially those with cameras).