Tag: Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri)

This little Blenny is a very common species found at practically all of the sites we visit that have reef or rock formations close to the surface. This includes all of the shallow inshore reefs, as well as the upper 10m of the water column at deeper sites such as Sail Rock.

This is a small species of less than 10cm in length and can be quite difficult to approach. However, given some time, they tend to become used to the presence of a diver who is making few movements, at which point it's possible to get some reasonably good photos of them.

It is distinguished by an overall brownish colouration becoming gradually more

yellowish towards the rear. The second dorsal and caudal fins are noticeably yellowish, whilst the rays of the otherwise transparent pectoral fins also have a brown/yellow colouration.

There are numerous small red spots and lines around the face area and fringe-like cirri on the nape

Although very common, there's is considerable doubt as to the correct identification of this Blenny, although after many hours of checking (and frequent changes of mind), i've decided it most closely matches the Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri).

Two other species which are very similar in appearance, and are very strong candidates as the actual species identified here are the Scar-Faced Blenny (Cirripectes Vanderbilti) and the Red-Speckled Blenny (Cirripectes Variolosus).

This little Blenny is a very common species found at practically all of the sites we visit that have reef or rock formations close to the surface. This includes all of the shallow inshore reefs, as well as the upper 10m of the water column at deeper sites such as Sail Rock.

This is a small species of less than 10cm in length and can be quite difficult to approach. However, given some time, they tend to become used to the presence of a diver who is making few movements, at which point it's possible to get some reasonably good photos of them.

It is distinguished by an overall brownish colouration becoming gradually more

yellowish towards the rear. The second dorsal and caudal fins are noticeably yellowish, whilst the rays of the otherwise transparent pectoral fins also have a brown/yellow colouration.

There are numerous small red spots and lines around the face area and fringe-like cirri on the nape

Although very common, there's is considerable doubt as to the correct identification of this Blenny, although after many hours of checking (and frequent changes of mind), i've decided it most closely matches the Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri).

Two other species which are very similar in appearance, and are very strong candidates as the actual species identified here are the Scar-Faced Blenny (Cirripectes Vanderbilti) and the Red-Speckled Blenny (Cirripectes Variolosus).

Alan's picture
Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri)

In this close-up shot of what is possibly the Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri), the red lines and dots which are its main distinguishing feature are clearly visible.
Also visible here are the tiny "cirri" along the nape of the neck.

Alan's picture
Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri)

Another nice profile shot of what is probably the Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri).

Alan's picture
Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri)

The distinguishing features of what i think is a Springer's Blenny (Cirripectes Springeri) are clear in this side profile eg. the over-all brownish colouration, yellowish fins and red spots and lines around the face.
Also visible are the little "cirri" on the forehead.