Tag: Nocturna Goby (Amblygobius Nocturna)

The Nocturna Goby (Amblygobius Nocturna) is another reasonably common "sleeper" Goby found in local waters and bears a close resemblance to at least 3 other locally occurring species, those being the Orange-Striped Goby (Amblygobius Decussatus), Mural Goby (Valenciennea Muralis) and the Immaculate Goby (Valenciennea Immaculata).

Growing to around 10cm in length, the Nocturna Goby can be identified by its overall pale gray/white colouration with three horizontal bands along the body which may vary in colour from red, pink or orange.

The lower band begins at the corner of the mouth whilst the most prominent band extends around the snout and through the eye. The uppermost band originates from slightly behind the head and is less prominent than the others.

In most cases, the lower two bands are a dark red until they reach the pectoral fin, after which they broaden and fade to a more pinkish colour as they extend towards the caudal (tail) fin.

The single characteristic which allows for easy identification of this species when compared to those above is the presence of small dark markings along the center-line of the body, at the base of the dorsal fins.

Although there is a known variation of this species which is much paler overall, with less defined markings, it seems to be absent in local waters.

Nocturna Gobies can be found fairly easily at shallow inshore areas such as Mae Haad/Koh Ma on Koh Phangan where they are usually seen in pairs, close to a burrow or overhanging rock.

The Nocturna Goby (Amblygobius Nocturna) is another reasonably common "sleeper" Goby found in local waters and bears a close resemblance to at least 3 other locally occurring species, those being the Orange-Striped Goby (Amblygobius Decussatus), Mural Goby (Valenciennea Muralis) and the Immaculate Goby (Valenciennea Immaculata).

Growing to around 10cm in length, the Nocturna Goby can be identified by its overall pale gray/white colouration with three horizontal bands along the body which may vary in colour from red, pink or orange.

The lower band begins at the corner of the mouth whilst the most prominent band extends around the snout and through the eye. The uppermost band originates from slightly behind the head and is less prominent than the others.

In most cases, the lower two bands are a dark red until they reach the pectoral fin, after which they broaden and fade to a more pinkish colour as they extend towards the caudal (tail) fin.

The single characteristic which allows for easy identification of this species when compared to those above is the presence of small dark markings along the center-line of the body, at the base of the dorsal fins.

Although there is a known variation of this species which is much paler overall, with less defined markings, it seems to be absent in local waters.

Nocturna Gobies can be found fairly easily at shallow inshore areas such as Mae Haad/Koh Ma on Koh Phangan where they are usually seen in pairs, close to a burrow or overhanging rock.

Alan's picture
Nocturna Goby (Amblygobius Nocturna)

In this close-up, front view of a Nocturna Goby (Amblygobius Nocturna) photographed at Mae Haad, Koh Phangan, the characteristics of the three horizontal bands along the body are more apparent.

Alan's picture
Nocturna Goby (Amblygobius Nocturna)

This photo shows a Nocturna Goby (Amblygobius Nocturna) i came across during a dive at Mae Haad/Koh Ma.