Tag: White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea thyrsoidea)

The White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea thyrsoidea) is by far the most frequently encountered species of Moray Eel in local waters.

Growing to a maximum length of around 70cm, the White-eyed Moray is easily distinguished by its overall brownish colouration which has a gold, speckled pattern, particularly on the dorsal area.

As the name suggests, the eyes are white and there are rows of sensory pits around the face area.

This species can be found at most of the frequently visited dive and snorkelling sites in the area, although it appears to be far more common at the offshore sites such as Sail Rock.

As with most of its relatives, the White-Eyed Moray is a primarily nocturnal hunter, spending most of the day resting in holes or crevices, with only the head being visible.

The White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea thyrsoidea) is by far the most frequently encountered species of Moray Eel in local waters.

Growing to a maximum length of around 70cm, the White-eyed Moray is easily distinguished by its overall brownish colouration which has a gold, speckled pattern, particularly on the dorsal area.

As the name suggests, the eyes are white and there are rows of sensory pits around the face area.

This species can be found at most of the frequently visited dive and snorkelling sites in the area, although it appears to be far more common at the offshore sites such as Sail Rock.

As with most of its relatives, the White-Eyed Moray is a primarily nocturnal hunter, spending most of the day resting in holes or crevices, with only the head being visible.

Alan's picture
White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea Thyrsoidea)

The White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea Thyrsoidea) is reasonably common at all local dive sites, particularly Sail Rock where this individual was photographed.

Alan's picture
White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea Thyrsoidea)

This close-up of a White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea Thyrsoidea) clearly shows the sensory pits along the upper and lower jawline and snout.

Alan's picture
Regal Demoiselles (Neopomacentrus Cyanomos) harass a White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea Thyrsoidea)

In this photo, from Sail Rock, a group of juvenile Regal Demoiselle (Neopomacentrus Cyanomos) are "mobbing" a wandering White-Eyed Moray Eel (Siderea Thyrsoidea).