Tag: Freckled Goby (Amblygobius Bynoensis)

At fist glance, the Freckled Goby (Amblygobius Bynoensis) is similar in appearance to the closely related Dragon Goby (Amblygobius Phalaena), the most notable difference being its paler overall colour.

In addition to its pale colouration, the main distinguishing features of the Freckled Goby are two dark brown, blue-edged horizontal bands on the side of the the head, the lower band being shorter and terminating at the base of the pectoral fin whilst the upper band ends slightly behind the level of the front edge of the first dorsal fin.

The upper dark band continues forward and darkens significantly as it transects the eye and continues around the snout, including most of the upper lip, however none of the blue-edging is present through the eye or snout area.

There are a cluster of dark brown/red-ish spots from above the black band on the upper lip, between the eyes, and terminating at the front edge of the first dorsal fin.

The dorsal fins are very light-tan coloured with numerous pale spots and lines, the upper margins are also tan coloured along the full length.

There are a number of short brown, near-vertical bars along the back, originating at the base of the dorsal fins, although these become shorter and less distinct posteriorly.

Some individuals exhibit either one or two dark/black spots at the base of the caudal fin. In some instances, it appeared that the larger individuals had more prominent spots in this area than small individuals, possibly suggesting an adult/juvenile variation whereas in others, there seemed to be a variation between individuals of similar size. This may suggest sexual dimorphism between male and female.

Growing to a maximum length of around 10cm, the Freckled Goby can be found very close to the shore-line, at depths of around a meter or so.

They appear to be more commonly found in pairs although thus far, they do not appear to abundant locally, with Mae Haad (Koh Phangan) being the only place i've encountered them. It is also interesting to note that all of the pairs found were in the shallow sandy zone between the beach and the reef, with none being seen on the seaward side.

At fist glance, the Freckled Goby (Amblygobius Bynoensis) is similar in appearance to the closely related Dragon Goby (Amblygobius Phalaena), the most notable difference being its paler overall colour.

In addition to its pale colouration, the main distinguishing features of the Freckled Goby are two dark brown, blue-edged horizontal bands on the side of the the head, the lower band being shorter and terminating at the base of the pectoral fin whilst the upper band ends slightly behind the level of the front edge of the first dorsal fin.

The upper dark band continues forward and darkens significantly as it transects the eye and continues around the snout, including most of the upper lip, however none of the blue-edging is present through the eye or snout area.

There are a cluster of dark brown/red-ish spots from above the black band on the upper lip, between the eyes, and terminating at the front edge of the first dorsal fin.

The dorsal fins are very light-tan coloured with numerous pale spots and lines, the upper margins are also tan coloured along the full length.

There are a number of short brown, near-vertical bars along the back, originating at the base of the dorsal fins, although these become shorter and less distinct posteriorly.

Some individuals exhibit either one or two dark/black spots at the base of the caudal fin. In some instances, it appeared that the larger individuals had more prominent spots in this area than small individuals, possibly suggesting an adult/juvenile variation whereas in others, there seemed to be a variation between individuals of similar size. This may suggest sexual dimorphism between male and female.

Growing to a maximum length of around 10cm, the Freckled Goby can be found very close to the shore-line, at depths of around a meter or so.

They appear to be more commonly found in pairs although thus far, they do not appear to abundant locally, with Mae Haad (Koh Phangan) being the only place i've encountered them. It is also interesting to note that all of the pairs found were in the shallow sandy zone between the beach and the reef, with none being seen on the seaward side.

Alan's picture
Freckled Goby (Amblygobius Bynoensis)

In this photo of a pair of Freckled Gobies (Amblygobius Bynoensis), taken very close to shore at Mae Haad beach - Koh Phangan, it is noticeable that the individual on the right has a single dark spot at the base of the caudal fin whilst the one on the left has two.

Alan's picture
Freckled Goby (Amblygobius Bynoensis)

In this photo, taken very close to shore at Mae Haad beach - Koh Phangan, almost all of the main distinguishing features of the Freckled Goby (Amblygobius Bynoensis) are clearly visible, eg.
Two dark, blue-edged bands at the side of the face