Tag: Gobies (Gobiidae)

Gobies belong to the largest group of marine fish with as many as 2,000 individual species identified to date. Most are carnivorous and live mainly on sand flats close to coral reefs. Many species share an underground burrow in a symbiotic relationship with one or more shrimps of the genus Alpheus. The almost blind shrimps rely on the excellent eyesight of the goby to avoid nearby predators, whilst the goby benefits from the industrious efforts of the shrimp in maintaining the burrow.

Gobies belong to the largest group of marine fish with as many as 2,000 individual species identified to date. Most are carnivorous and live mainly on sand flats close to coral reefs. Many species share an underground burrow in a symbiotic relationship with one or more shrimps of the genus Alpheus. The almost blind shrimps rely on the excellent eyesight of the goby to avoid nearby predators, whilst the goby benefits from the industrious efforts of the shrimp in maintaining the burrow.
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Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina Nigrivirgata) - Variation 2

This Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina nigrivirgata), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, also shows the "typical" colouration for locally occurring specimens, although the narrow bands that occasionally t

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Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina Nigrivirgata) - Variation 1

This Black-Line Shrimp Goby (Myersina nigrivirgata), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma, shows the "typical" colouration for specimens in local waters.

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Banded Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Cinctus) - Yellow and Dark Variations

This photograph from Tanote Bay, Koh Tao shows the fairly uncommon combination of both the yellow/gold and darker brown variations of Banded Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus cinctus) together.

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Lagoon Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus Cyanotaenia)

This Lagoon Shrimp Goby (Cryptocentrus cyanotaenia), photographed at Mae Haad/Koh Ma reef, shows yet another slight colour variation.

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Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) - Male

The "resident" male Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) emerges from a cloud of silt created by one of its "partner" Alpheid Shrimps.

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Giant Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Fontanesii) - Juvenile

Juvenile Giant Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Fontanesii)

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Giant Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Fontanesii)

Giant Shrimpgoby (Amblyeleotris Fontanesii)

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Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) - Male

This photograph of a male Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides), taken at Mae Haad/Koh Ma clearly shows the significant difference between the sexes in terms of colouration and markin

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Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides) - Female

This photograph of a female Blue-Spotted Shrimpgoby (Cryptocentrus Pavoninoides), taken at Mae Haad/Koh Ma shows the features unique to the female of the species, as well as those shared by both mal

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Shadow Goby (Yongeichthys Nebulosus)

This photo of a Shadow Goby (Yongeichthys Nebulosus), photographed below Chaloklum pier at a depth of around 2m, clearly shows the main distinguishing features of the species eg.