Tag: Snappers (Lutjanidae)

Although there are many, unrelated fish species which go by the name "Snapper", the true Snappers are generally accepted to be those of the family Lutjanidae which comprises approximately 100 species within 16 genera and are a common throughout tropical and sub-tropical seas.

By far the largest sub-group within the family is the genus Lutjanus which represents almost 70% of all Snapper species.

Unsurprisingly, it is the genus Lutjanus to which the majority of locally occurring species belong.

Size, aggregation and abundance of local Snapper species varies greatly, with the relatively small Bigeye Snapper (Lutjanus Lutjanus) often forming large, tightly packed schools.

This is in sharp contrast to other species such as the Yellow-Streaked Snapper (Lutjanus Lemniscatus) which appears to be solitary by nature and is one of the least common species in the area.

Although there are many, unrelated fish species which go by the name "Snapper", the true Snappers are generally accepted to be those of the family Lutjanidae which comprises approximately 100 species within 16 genera and are a common throughout tropical and sub-tropical seas.

By far the largest sub-group within the family is the genus Lutjanus which represents almost 70% of all Snapper species.

Unsurprisingly, it is the genus Lutjanus to which the majority of locally occurring species belong.

Size, aggregation and abundance of local Snapper species varies greatly, with the relatively small Bigeye Snapper (Lutjanus Lutjanus) often forming large, tightly packed schools.

This is in sharp contrast to other species such as the Yellow-Streaked Snapper (Lutjanus Lemniscatus) which appears to be solitary by nature and is one of the least common species in the area.

Alan's picture
Sail Rock's amazing marine life!

A diver swims headlong into a huge school of Big-EyeSnapper(Lutjanus lutjanus) at

Alan's picture
Big-Eye Snapper engulf the East Pinnacle at Sail Rock

This school of Big-eye Snapper (Lutjanus Lutjanus) is only a very small example of the enormous schools of various fish species almost obscuring the East Pinnacle from view!!

Alan's picture
Brown-Striped Snapper (Lutjanus Vitta) Adult

This photo shows what i'm sure is a fully mature adult Brown-Striped Snapper (Lutjanus Vitta).

Although all of the references i checked specifically mention the brown stripe along the body as the distinguishing characteristic of the species (as can be seen in my other photos), the brown stripe appears to fade with maturity.

Alan's picture
Brown-Striped Snapper (Lutjanus Vitta)

This photo shows what i am sure is an almost mature Brown-Striped Snapper (Lutjanus Vitta).
The characteristic brown stripe has faded considerably, but is still visible whilst the fins show the yellow colouration which seems more evident in mature individuals.

Alan's picture
Brown-Striped Snapper (Lutjanus Vitta)

This photo shows a Brown-Striped Snapper (Lutjanus Vitta) which i suspect is almost mature as the characteristic brown/black stripe along the body is less defined than that of a juvenile .

The body and fins are less pale, with the fins in particular having a more pronounced yellow colouration.

Alan's picture
Brown-Striped Snapper (Lutjanus Vitta) - Sub Adult

This photo, taken in the 20 - 30m depth range at Sail Rock shows the more defined brown/black stripe along the body of the juvenile Brown-Striped Snapper (Lutjanus Vitta).

Alan's picture
Big-Eye Trevallies (Caranx Sexfasciatus) & Big-Eye Snapper (Lutjanus Lutjanus)

A short journey over to the East Pinnacle at Sail Rock is well worth the effor