Tag: Big-Eye Snapper (Lutjanus lutjanus)

Although the Big-Eye Snapper (Lutjanus lutjanus) is one of the smallest species of Snapper found in local waters, what it lacks in size, it more than makes up for in numbers.

Found mainly at the deeper offshore locations such as Sail Rock and South West Pinnacles, the Big-Eye Snapper often form tightly congregated schools, particularly in less sheltered areas where the water movement is stronger

Growing to a maximum length of around 35cm, the Big-Eye Snapper is often confused with similarly colour, unrelated species such as Ox-Eye Scad (Selar boops), especially as their large schools are often found in very close proximity of each other.

The Big-Eye Snapper is less "deep-bodied" than its larger relatives.

As the name suggests, it possesses large eyes relative to its body size.

The lower (ventral) half of the body is predominantly silver in colour with a few rows of faint brownish/yellow horizontal lines.

There is a broad yellow horizontal band along the length of the body, from the behind the eye to the caudal fin.

All of the fins are yellow, with the exception of the pectoral and ventral fins, which are almost transparent, although these may show a yellow tinge, particularly at the base of the pectoral fin.

Perhaps the most distinctive feature for visual identification is the rows of narrow, diagonal yellow lines originating along the length of the lateral line, on the dorsal side. These lines usually become less distinctive towards the caudal fin at which point the the body appears almost solid yellow in colour.

Although the Big-Eye Snapper (Lutjanus lutjanus) is one of the smallest species of Snapper found in local waters, what it lacks in size, it more than makes up for in numbers.

Found mainly at the deeper offshore locations such as Sail Rock and South West Pinnacles, the Big-Eye Snapper often form tightly congregated schools, particularly in less sheltered areas where the water movement is stronger

Growing to a maximum length of around 35cm, the Big-Eye Snapper is often confused with similarly colour, unrelated species such as Ox-Eye Scad (Selar boops), especially as their large schools are often found in very close proximity of each other.

The Big-Eye Snapper is less "deep-bodied" than its larger relatives.

As the name suggests, it possesses large eyes relative to its body size.

The lower (ventral) half of the body is predominantly silver in colour with a few rows of faint brownish/yellow horizontal lines.

There is a broad yellow horizontal band along the length of the body, from the behind the eye to the caudal fin.

All of the fins are yellow, with the exception of the pectoral and ventral fins, which are almost transparent, although these may show a yellow tinge, particularly at the base of the pectoral fin.

Perhaps the most distinctive feature for visual identification is the rows of narrow, diagonal yellow lines originating along the length of the lateral line, on the dorsal side. These lines usually become less distinctive towards the caudal fin at which point the the body appears almost solid yellow in colour.

Alan's picture
Sail Rock's amazing marine life!

A diver swims headlong into a huge school of Big-EyeSnapper(Lutjanus lutjanus) at

Alan's picture
Big-Eye Snapper engulf the East Pinnacle at Sail Rock

This school of Big-eye Snapper (Lutjanus Lutjanus) is only a very small example of the enormous schools of various fish species almost obscuring the East Pinnacle from view!!

Alan's picture
Big-Eye Trevallies (Caranx Sexfasciatus) & Big-Eye Snapper (Lutjanus Lutjanus)

A short journey over to the East Pinnacle at Sail Rock is well worth the effor